Game of Thrones

Brace yourself … to celebrate, take this quiz and see which Game of Thrones character most embodies your professional style. And here, unlike as in most of Westeros, answering truthfully is NOT optional. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Results

Mostly 1s

 

Ned Stark – you always play by the rules, and while you are respected by your peers, you have narrow conservative views. Being such a traditionalist will ultimately be your downfall. Loosen up a bit.

Mostly 2s 

Cat Stark – straitlaced and determined. You sometimes make bad decisions, because although you’re passionate about winning, your self-centric outlook blinkers you to the big picture. When you attend meetings your mind is always half on the kids at home (especially the broken one.) You’re a firm believer in people over technology.

Mostly 3s 

Petyr ‘Littlefinger’ Baelish – cold, manipulative and willing to betray anyone to get to the top. You understand the rules and use them to your advantage without being seen to go outside them (not that you don’t break them on occasion – you just leave no witnesses).

Mostly 4s

 

Arya Stark – young, fast and smart. You have an extensive network at your disposal and as a digital native you use technology to your advantage. You should probably learn to relax a little more, and it wouldn’t hurt you to occasionally listen to one of the old guys.

Mostly 5s

 

Khal Drogo – mad, bad, impulsive (and a little bit hot), your direct approach to issues certainly gets results but may alienate potential allies before they realise you mean them well.

Mostly 6s

 

The Red Lady – a little bit freaky, potentially inflammatory, but certainly effective. You have everyone on the back foot by making them very, very nervous around you.

Mostly 7s 

Jon Snow – you’re in over your head. You mean well but you’re naïve to the ways of the world of management and bluffing your way through it– you’re going to get chewed up and spat out if you don’t find a mentor or coach to show you the ropes. Try to strategize your career development more.

Mostly 8s 

Tyrion Lannister – definitely senior management material, you know what everyone – on every level – is up to. You’re sincere (to a point), extremely well informed and a strategic decision maker, despite the odd misstep. We predict you’ll end up in the big seat, but it might be lonely at the top.

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Welcome Slumber

The best preparation for a good tomorrow is a good night’s sleep today.

~ Old Irish Proverb

Sleep over it

Sleep is not merely a little time snatched from a busy schedule. It is vital for your mental, physical, and emotional well-being. Our lifestyles have changed but our bodies have not. So you may like to meet your body’s need for rest and sleep.

We must acknowledge the pivotal role of a good night’s sleep in the holistic well-being of the individual. Thus, you must find, in the tiny details of your room, a consistent effort to make sure, the greatest effort; that your sleep is not disturbed; and that you awaken fresh and rested the next day.

This little post includes some tips to help you deal with common sleep disturbances. I hope you find it useful.

Are you sleeping enough?

  1. Does the idea of a quick nap in the afternoon appeal to you?
  2. Is a long lie-in your idea of the perfect vacation?
  3. Do you roll over and steal just five minutes more of sleep in the mornings?

If you said yes to any of the above, it is more than likely that you have cut into your body’s sleep needs. The number of people, who, quite effortlessly, manage to pile up a huge ‘sleep debt’, is quite amazing.

Sleep is not merely time out from a busy schedule, and it is definitely not a waste of time. Sleep is a vital necessity, essential for good health – mental, physical, and emotional.

 Why sleep?

Insufficient sleep has myriad repercussions, from lower concentration levels to lack of muscular coördination.

When we use sleep time to increase productivity, we are actually laying the ground for diminishing returns in the long run. Not only does lack of sleep affect short-term efficiency, in the long run it results in a lower quality of life and deteriorating health.

However, one thing is clear, it isn’t how many hours we sleep that is the issue, but how we sleep; how rested we are when we wake up; and how well we go about the day.

Define your needs

Sleep patterns and needs vary from person to person, and with age. For most people, their biological clock, which is located in the brain, is aligned to a 24 hour cycle known as the circadian rhythm.

Circadian rhythms are influenced by exposure of sunlight, and can be measured by the distinct rise and fall in body temperature, as well as the presence of certain hormones in the bloodstream.

Most people’s rhythms are set to alert and active during daylight, and sleep at night. Of course, variations occur. Some people like to wake up early, others are at their best late evening. It is important to listen to your own biorhythm and work your lifestyle around it.

Do you get SAD?

This dependency of the daily cycle of the human system on exposure to sunlight is underlined by the diagnosis of the Seasonal Affective Disorder syndrome – a hormonal imbalance that occurs when this strong light signal is not received. It is more often seen in colder climates, where the onset of winter dramatically reduces sunlight levels.

The symptoms of SAD include sleep disorders, drop in concentration levels, exhaustion, lethargy, even depression. The disorder is treated, quite simply, by exposure to bright light.

So, bright light resets circadian rhythms. This fact that has been very effectively used to increase the productivity of the working day in these days of artificial lighting, but at what cost!

Changing time zones

SAD is also one of the reasons why travellers suffer from that most common sleep disorder – Jet lag. This is not the state of mind as it is often made out to be, but a physical condition that results from an imbalance between the body’s natural biological clock and the move to a different time zone.

It is possible to cut this imbalance by:

  1. Arriving at the destination early in the evening and staying awake till 10 pm local time.
  2. Avoiding a heavy meal upon arrival.
  3. Maximising exposure to sunlight as a stimulant to regulate the biological clock; Staying out of natural light increases jet-lag.
  4. Avoiding stimulants for at least 3 or 4 hours before bedtime, as these retard sleep.
  5. Avoiding heavy exercise close to bedtime for the same reason.
  6. Using ear plugs and blindfolds when trying to sleep to avoid any disturbance.

Why can’t you sleep?

What are the other factors that affect sleep?

These can be considered under three categories:

  • Physical
  • Psychological, and
  • Environmental

Physical problems that give rise to sleep disorders could be illness, pain, or discomfort. There are also numerous physiological sleep disorders that make it difficult to sleep well. Sleep Apnoea, recognised by snoring and interrupted breathing; involuntary limb movements that  disturb the normal sleep pattern, hormonal imbalance, etc. are all very real problems that can come in the way of a good night’s rest.

Burning both ends

Amongst psychological factors, stress is the major cause of short-term sleeping difficulties. Though usually the problem disappears once the situation improves, very often it so happens that stress becomes part of an integral lifestyle. Such a situation can be very difficult to resolve.

Lifestyles nowadays are not particularly conducive to a good night’s sleep. Heavy meals, stimulating drinks, erratic schedules that result in mental or physical stimulation close to what should be bedtime, confuse the system by giving a wake-up call when it should relax.

Work habits that call for late nights, coordinating across time zones such as, can play havoc with the body’s circadian rhythms.

Tossing and turning

Environmental factors include:-

Noise: This works both ways. While there are some sounds that inhibit sleep, some that will jolt you awake, it is also true that the absence of a familiar sound will not let you sleep. There are also some ‘white sounds’ such as the steady, low hum of an air conditioner or the whirring of a fan that can help sleep by blocking other sounds.

Bed, Mattress & Pillows: Physical comfort has a lot to do with quality of sleep. An uncomfortable surface or cramped space will definitely not result in fresh morning.

Temperature: If a room is too hot or too cold, it will disturb a good night’s sleep. Ideally the bedroom should be at 72 degrees Fahrenheit or 22 degrees Celsius.

For a good night’s sleep…

  • Exercise regularly, though not within three hours of settling down to sleep. Give your body a chance to cool down.
  • Avoid foods and drinks that are high in protein, carbohydrates and sugar towards the end of the day. The best bedtime snack is a complex carbohydrate with some protein and calcium content, such as a glass of warm milk. A glass of warm milk helps you drop off into a refreshing slumber.
  • Avoid bright lights. These will stimulate your system and ‘wake’ you up. The drapes over the window should be specially designed to hold daylight at bay and fill your room with the soft comforting darkness of night when you feel the need.
  • Establish a bed-time routine that will signal ‘relax’ to your brain.
  • Create a warm, comfortable sleep environment that is as pleasant, dark and quiet as you want it to be. Clear your mind. Don’t let daytime worries or stress intrude.
  • Set a morning alarm. It is possible that the fear of waking up late will not let you sleep peacefully. You must fix at least two wake-up calls or alarms so that you don’t worry about oversleeping.
  • Put on a soft, highly effective eye mask while retiring to bed, that will convince your tired eyes to relax.  If you are looking to muffle even the tiniest whisper of disturbance, then put on ear plugs that will gently protect your sleep.

Is this the best smartphone ever?

Samsung unveils its slick new waterproof Galaxy S5 that comes with super-fast Wi-Fi, a 16MP camera – plus a matching smartwatch and fitness band that monitors your heart. The flagship model was unveiled at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona along with Gear Fit – a wearable fitness device. It has a 5.25-inch screen, 16MP camera and runs Android KitKat 4.4. Software and icons now look similar to Apple’s ‘flatter’ iOS design. Handset comes in four colours: black, white, blue and gold and is dust and water resistant. Prices have not yet been announced but it will be available in April.

In a world almost bursting at the seams with fitness bands, smartphones, wearables and cameras it takes something special to stand out – and Samsung hopes its new Galaxy S5 will do just that.

The Galaxy S5, dubbed the ‘superphone’ has handpicked features from its competitors and put them all into a single handset.

Samsung claims it crams in a professional camera and a powerful fitness tracker while being water and dust proof – and comes with fingerprint sensor technology, just like arch rival the iPhone 5S.

Like Apple's iPhone 5S, Samsung's latest handset has a Finger Scanner, providing a secure, biometric screen locking feature, but the real innovations come inside with super fast Wi-Fi and a host of fitness functions

Like Apple’s iPhone 5S, Samsung’s latest handset has a Finger Scanner, providing a secure, biometric screen locking feature, but the real innovations come inside with super fast Wi-Fi and a host of fitness functions

S5 SPECS

  • 142.0 x 72.5 x 8.1mm, 145g
  • 5.1″ FHD Super AMOLED (1920 x 1080)
  • 2.5GHz quad-core application processor
  • Android 4.4.2 (KitKat)
  • 16MP (rear), 2.0MP (front) camera
  • Ultra HD  30fps video recording
  • Selective Focus camera
  • Finger Scanner, Heart rate sensor
  • Dust and water resistant
  • Ultra Power Saving Mode
  • WiFi: 802.11a/b/g/n/ac HT80, MIMO(2×2)
  • IR Remote
  • 2800mAh  battery – Standby time: 390 hrs / Talk time: 21 hrs

The new flagship device includes a built-in heart monitor, pedometer, fitness apps and fingerprint recognition.

Samsung¿s apps can then develop a fitness regime, including a range of activities from jogging to climbing the stairs rather than using the lift, to help people improve their health. Here, CEO J.K. Shin talks about the different fitness features at Mobile World Congress

The Galaxy S5 is at the head of a move by tech giants to turn the ever more sophisticated mobile phone into a substitute doctor and personal trainer.

Samsung’s S5 has its own health functions, but it will also connect to the company’s second generation smartwatch, the Gear 2, as well as a new wearable band device, the Gear Fit, which will play a role in measuring fitness.
The watch and fitness band can pick up the pulse through the skin on the wrist and display it on the small screen throughout a normal day, or during a workout. All of the information gathered by the devices can be used to calculate the number of steps taken, calories burned and general fitness. Samsung’s apps can then develop a fitness regime, including a range of activities from jogging to climbing the stairs rather than using the lift, to help people improve their health.
The Galaxy S5 (pictured) has handpicked features from it's competitors and taken it's lead from the professional photo industry to launch an outstanding device
Here, CEO J.K. Shin talks about the different fitness features at Mobile World Congress.

The Galaxy S5 (pictured) has handpicked features from it’s competitors and taken it’s lead from the professional photo industry to launch an outstanding device. The firm’s ‘S Health 3.0’ software creates graphs or tables of the results to track changes in activity and health over time. Samsung’s apps can then develop a fitness regime, including a range of activities from jogging to climbing the stairs rather than using the lift, to help people improve their health. Exercise, food, sleep, stress, and weight. You can monitor and track each of these areas with Samsung’s Lifestyle Coach app. Part of the S Health suite. 

‘We’ve decided to go back to basics with the Galaxy S5 and focus on the features and things that matter the most to our customers – namely the camera, ability to view and download data and content quickly and their health and wellbeing,’ said Simon Stanford, Vice President of IT & Mobile division, Samsung Electronics UK & Ireland.

Samsung has unveiled a new flagship device (pictured) that includes a built-in heart monitor, pedometer, fitness apps and fingerprint recognition

The S5 has a 16MP camera – an improvement on the 13MP camera seen on the S4 – and features a number of advanced editing and focus tools similar to those on the 5S.

The new camera has twice as many megapixels as Apple’s iPhone 5S.

The smartphone's contoured shape comes in an array of colours, including: Charcoal Black, Shimmery White, Electric Blue and Copper Gold. It is dust and water resistant. The colours can be seen here on show at the event

The smartphone’s contoured shape comes in an array of colours, including: Charcoal Black, Shimmery White, Electric Blue and Copper Gold. It is dust and water resistant. The colours can be seen here on show at the event

GEAR FIT SPECIFICATIONS

  • Display: 1.84inch curved Super AMOLED
  • Includes: Pedometer, exercise and heart rate sensors, stopwatch and timer
  • Notifications: For SMS, calls, emails and apps
  • Strap: Changeable in three colours, the band is IP67 dust and water resistant
  • Connectivity: Bluetooth v4.0 LE
  • Dimensions: 23.4mm x 57.4mm x 11.95 mm
  • Weight: 27g
  • Battery: 210mAh with 3-4 days of typical usage or 5 days of low usage

Mr JK Shin, president and CEO of Samsung Electronics said:

Samsung has been one of the major contributors of the mobile industry’s high growth. Especially, the Galaxy S series has been a key driver of smartphone growth. A total of 200 million people use Galaxy S devices. People are easily excited about technology – disruptive and breakthrough. We’re interested in meaningful innovation. It’s surprisingly simple. Our customers don’t want eye-popping technology, they want design. Our consumers want a simple yet powerful camera. Our consumers want powerful and seamless connectivity and our consumers want a phone that helps them stay for.

JK Shin unveiled Samsung's Gear Fit by simply pulling back the sleeve on his left arm. The wearable device (pictured) gives notifications about SMS, missed calls, and the like, while also serving as a way to monitor a person's heart rate while exercising.

Mr Shin unveiled a companion device to the new phone – Gear Fit – by simply pulling back the sleeve on his left arm. The wearable device gives users notifications about SMS, missed calls, while also serving as a way to monitor their heart rate while exercising. It has a 5.1inch Full HD Super AMOLED display that can be dimmed  – ‘it is equipped with a screen that fits perfectly on your wrist,’ he said.

Samsung's Gear fit (pictured) has a 5.1inch Full HD Super AMOLED display that can be dimmed

‘ONE TRUE SUPERPHONE’ – WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY

On paper, the Galaxy S5 is packed with more features than any other smartphone currently available, thanks to a combination of its fingerprint sensor, heart rate sensor, clever camera tricks and waterproof design. It’s taken the most innovative features from other phones – the Xperia Z1’s waterproof design, the iPhone 5s’ fingerprint sensor – and combined them all into one true superphone.
– Esat Dedezade, Stuff

There’s no question the S5 is an iteration on the S4, rather than a complete overhaul. But they’re all iterations in strong areas. At our briefing for the Galaxy S4 we were told the then-new phone would let you scroll text up and down by tilting the phone. This time we’re told we can shoot HD videos with high-dynamic ranges applied in real-time, underwater. We’ll let the reader decide which of those two announcements is more exciting.
– Nate Laxon, Wired

The heart rate monitor might be a bit of a gimmick and even the fingerprint sensor could be considered that – but they’re good to have as extras and to add greater potential future software development options. Combined with the Gear 2 or Gear Fit the Samsung Galaxy S5 is a complete life tracker and complete life management device – we can’t wait to get our review sample to really push its apparently near-boundless limits.
– Luke Edwards, Pocket Lint

Like the new Gear wearables, the Galaxy S5 looks and feels familiar, but offers a number of improvements over last year’s edition. Samsung had a successful formula with the Galaxy S4, and for the most part, it looks like it has retained that with the S5. Things are faster, nicer feeling, and easier to use, but it’s still a Samsung smartphone through and through, and will likely be just as successful if not more so than its predecessor.
– Dan Seifert The Verge

All told, it’s very much a run-of-the-mill Galaxy S flagship, but there are enough new hardware features and software tweaks to make it feel fresh.
– Brad Molen, Engadget